Michaela’s Job Ad

I’ve been resisting the urge to write about Michaela Community School. This is mainly because I am ambivalent about it. I have not visited the school, and I have not read Battle Hymn of the Tiger Teachers. I know nothing of the school beyond the discourse on Twitter, and some basic Internet searches. I am aware that my initial thoughts about the school probably reflect my own ideology (and there’s a whole other Foucault inspired blog post waiting to be written on that topic).

Therefore, it is not my intention (yet) to comment upon its practices, and certainly not my intention to comment upon the individuals who work there. I’d like this to be very clear because there are those engaged in EduTwitter who are perfectly happy to criticise and make comments about this school and its staff without looking beyond the rhetoric. They argue that the school puts itself on a pedestal, engaging in aggressive self-promotion via insulting the rest of the teaching profession. There is some interesting dialogue occurring in response to the information which MCS puts out, but I fear that this gets lost in the shouting and boo-hissing which seems to erupt around this school, as if it were some pantomime villain. I must confess to finding some of the rhetoric from MCS somewhat distasteful, but it certainly does not warrant the kind of venom which oozes through a tweet labelling its staff as a “bunch of c****s”.

So, whilst I am not here to critique the school itself, I am really rather intrigued by the discourse surrounding it. And this is perfectly exemplified by the reaction to an advert published in the TES purporting to be for a School Detention Director at MCS. I say “purporting” because some of the response on Twitter has been to question the authenticity of the advert, such is the nature of its wording. Here it is:

screen-shot-2017-01-29-at-20-27-16

Days are 7:30am to 5:30pm, with Friday ending at 3:30pm

Do you like order and discipline?
Do you believe in children being obedient every time?
Do you believe that allowing children to make excuses is unkind?

If you do, then the role of Detention Director at Michaela Community School, could be for you.

This role isn’t suited to a would-be counsellor or to someone who wants to be every child’s best friend. This role is for someone who believes children need clear, firm discipline. This role is for someone who believes tough love is what children need to become better people and grow into responsible young adults.

We want someone who will analyse data, organise detentions, line-manage staff, be a sergeant major in the detention room, ring parents, be extremely efficient with time and paperwork, have heart-to-heart conversations with pupils and be inspirational.

You do not need any experience, but must be willing to learn on the job. You will need reasonable spoken English, but your written English does not have to be excellent. You must also be hard-working, willing to get stuck in and own the job like it is the most important thing in the world to you.

We will train you if you are the right person for the job. So don’t imagine you cannot do it. If you have presence, passion and a good voice, then we want to meet you!

The salary we are offering is far higher than a job like this would normally pay. This is because we want someone who is truly excellent. Even if we start you at the bottom of the range, the pay will rise quickly if you are good.

 

[Link is currently here, but I don’t intend to keep this updated, and I assume it will cease to work once the deadline has passed.]

Every aspect of the advert has been commented upon or derided in the Twitter chat, from the salary of £22k-£35k (“How can a school afford this?”), to the nature of the rhetorical questions, to the phrase “sergeant major”, and the stipulation that “your written English does not have to be excellent”. Indeed, the very existence of the advert has been seen as evidence that the school’s infamous behaviour policy doesn’t work. I can’t help but admire the kind of double-think that such a complaint requires.

But here’s the point. You know what this job is about. There is a kind of honesty about the wording, even if it does revel in its own brand of hyperbole, that is often lacking in school job adverts.

For comparison, let’s have a look at some of the other adverts currently listed on TES. I’ve selected secondary and I’ve also selected teacher in order to discard promoted roles. I’m not going to include the names of the schools or provide links.

Here’s the first one:

We seek to appoint a teacher of Physics with the ability to teach to A Level. This position is a full time post. We require someone with a strong subject knowledge and a passion to teach all the sciences to our younger students as well as Physics to our senior and most able students. This is an exciting opportunity for either a newly qualified or more experienced teacher to work within an ambitious and supportive department in a high achieving school. Excellent opportunities for development exist.

[School name] achieves outstanding examination results, has a strong focus on extra-curricular provision and seeks to nurture “mind, body and spirit”. We expect our staff to be fully committed to this ethos.

 

Here’s the second one:

[School name] is expanding its team as the school scales up and we launch our new sixth form and middle school. We are looking for an excellent art and design teacher who is passionate about their subject area and ready to develop their practice in a dynamic and innovative teaching environment. [School name] is an all-through school and your role will offer the opportunity to teach in the middle school as well as 14 to 18. The successful candidate will be an experienced teacher of Art and Design with a track record of achieving exceptional results and progress. Ideally, the candidate would have experience of teaching A-level and GCSE Art and Design and will have a well-developed skill set in the areas of printmaking, painting or illustration.

We believe the teaching of art and design should support students to think independently and to develop their own creative confidence as a means to making a difference to the world. Creating beautiful and expressive work is a key feature of [School name] as a whole and therefore we are looking for a highly collaborative individual who is passionate about spreading the use of arts or design-led approaches across the curriculum.

We are keen to build cross curricular links and develop projects that involve external partnerships. Our ideal candidate will enjoy collaboration and be keen to share and develop their understanding of project-based learning. Art and Design is popular subject within the secondary school and this will continue to be the case in the sixth form and middle school, so we are looking for a confident teacher who can help us build a distinctive and bold vision for the department going forward.

You will be trained in and develop a range of pedagogies including oracy-rich learning, project based learning, coaching, advanced literacy techniques and using technology effectively in the classroom. English Language is central to the life of [School name] and all teachers are expected to develop reading, writing and speaking skills within their subject. All teachers will also be expected to be a coach to about 13 students, developing their professionalism, well-being and confidence. In order to do this effectively, you will be trained as a one to one coach. Our oracy curriculum, teacher toolkit and our collaboration with Cambridge University has resulted in a school filled with purposeful talk and thinking. You will have the chance to shape this exciting area of the school’s culture, along with the ethos and core practices of the sixth form and middle school.

[School name] is a very special and different kind of place to work in. We empower staff to find their voice and their creativity. We offer collaboration and learning across ages and subjects. All staff have more planning time than most schools and a tailored programme of professional development which results in extraordinary outcomes for the students. We offer multiple routes to progression through subjects and pedagogies. We believe strongly in developing the full potential of all staff.

[School name] has built strong foundations in a short period of time, confirmed by our recent Ofsted which was outstanding in all categories. There was strong recognition for the ethos and approach of the school:

“Pupils across the school make exceptional progress.”

“Pupils have excellent attitudes to learning, impeccable manners and show respect for everyone.”

“Staff morale is exceptionally high. Teachers at the early stages of their career value the ‘fantastic’ professional development and opportunities to learn from each other. Those with more experience said that they have become much better teachers since joining the school.” 

Through project-based learning “pupils achieve remarkable standards of work and demonstrated knowledge and skills at levels beyond those expected for their age group.”

“Pupils talk and discuss with a maturity and confidence that is remarkable for their years.”

The successful candidate will be:

  • An excellent teacher and subject specialist 
  • Experienced at developing other teachers 
  • Skilled at fostering independent, student-led learning 
  • A creative and deep thinker about pedagogy 
  • A teacher of English language skills 
  • Innovative in using new technology to enhance learning 
  • A collaborative planner, able to work across subject disciplines 
  • Interested in the growth of every child – head, heart and hand 

ABOUT [SCHOOL NAME]:

  • 4 to 18 mixed, inclusive school in the heart of Stratford, Newham 
  • Cutting edge pedagogy and curriculum 
  • Small – only 75 children in each year group. From September 2017 we will have years 7 to 11, Reception to year 4, a new Sixth Form beginning and a Middle school starting for years 5 and 7 in the first year and years 5 to 8 in the second year. 
  • All teachers spend between 3 to 4 hours a week with their coaching group of about 13 students 
  • We have plans to set up two new schools in close proximity to [School name] which will give staff more opportunities to grow and develop. 

WE OFFER:

  • Outstanding career development and exceptional CPD 
  • Generous TLRs based on experience and skills 
  • The chance to network with outstanding practitioners and learn from the best 
  • Collaborative working across the 4 to 18 school 
  • Leadership training and development opportunities 
  • A strong feedback culture so that teachers can develop in areas of their practice that are important to them 
  • Every teacher being part of a team/circle that develops strategic practice

And a third:

[School name] is an established, successful and oversubscribed 11-18 mixed comprehensive school with 1300 on roll including a Sixth Form of 350+. The school is situated in outstandingly attractive grounds in a conservation area on the edge of London and achieves examination results well in excess of local and national averages. In addition to ‘Sportsmark’ we have also been awarded Arts Council ‘Artsmark Gold’ and the Religious Studies Bronze Award. In December 2016, Ofsted judged us to be a ‘GOOD’ school, maintaining this judgement from 2012.   

We are seeking to appoint a well-qualified, highly motivated professional who is an excellent classroom practitioner with a record of effective teaching or teaching practice to join our Modern Foreign Languages Faculty.    

Applications are welcomed from NQT’s and those professionals who can demonstrate a successful track record of innovation to inspire both students and colleagues alike. You must be able to teach French and Spanish to GCSE and either or both languages to A Level.    

We can offer well behaved and willing students; a friendly staff; well-equipped classrooms with interactive whiteboards; and well supported A Level classes. 

 

Advert #1 is short, but manages to pack in the key terms of educational jargon: “passionate”, “exciting opportunity”, “ambitious”, “high achieving”, and even “outstanding”. And yet these words tell us nothing really about the school. It could be anywhere, so generic is this language.

We go from the stunning shortness of advert #1, to the novella of #2. I suppose, at least, that that this one gives some sense of what the school stands for, with it’s reference to “project based learning” reflecting a pedagogy grounded in the progressive mythology of 21st Century Skills; a pedagogy which they see as being the grounds for securing the Outstanding Ofsted grading from which it quotes. This advert utilises jargon to which those of us whom work in schools have probably become so immune that we don’t even notice it anymore: they want somebody with “a track record of achieving exceptional results and progress”; they offer a “dynamic and innovative teaching environment”; and they are so keen for someone who is “passionate” that the word appears twice.

Advert #3 offers us the jargon bingo entries of “highly motivated professional”, “excellent classroom practitioner”, and “record of effective teaching” all in one sentence. Here we want people to “inspire” and we are still peddling “interactive whiteboards” as a perk. And whilst the school is only “good” by Ofsted standards (having made no progress in this regard for four years, it seems), at least the grounds are “outstandingly attractive”, and the school has some nice badges to hang in reception.

Interestingly, none of these adverts mentions behaviour.

I have, of course, been deliberately picky and harsh with my critique of these adverts in terms of the wording and language used therein. I’m having a bit of fun at their expense. But are they really any more desirable than the much derided advert from MCS?

Perhaps the bluntness of the MCS advert is hard for us to accept, so inculcated are we in the corporate banality of educational discourse as it typically appears in job adverts. Or perhaps it is the honesty with which the school acknowledges that behaviour is an issue, or certainly a priority, and that it demands a full time, well paid post in order to support its teachers. Or perhaps the school stands for something that is so different from accepted orthodoxy that it has become a kind of totem – or anti-totem; less a subject of worship but an artefact of scorn. Perhaps, for some, the school is a manifestation of pedagogical practice that epitomises the dreaded Gove. For others, the school is a victim of its own propaganda; an open target for ridicule.

For me, MCS generates a field of discourse that helps me to formulate my own theorem, where Newton meets Foucault:

For every statement, there is an opposite and totally unequal reactionary statement.

Five Years

It turns out that this blog is five years old. I haven’t really done as much with it as I had originally hoped; only a small number of posts, but gaining increasing readership as my Twitter follower count has increased.

I feel I’ve come some distance in that five years. Professionally, I’ve moved from the dark authoritarianism of a school locked in a dance macabre with a system it doesn’t understand, into the paradoxical forward looking freedom of an independent cathedral school, steeped in history and tradition. Personally, I’ve come through a heart attack and, 18 months later, a cardiac arrest which gave me a nudge into a seeing things differently. Academically, I’ve moved away from thinking Facebook groups might improve learning, to trying to construct a Foucauldian positioning of education discourse on Twitter. And virtually, I have engaged with the most extraordinary group of people from whom I have learnt more about teaching than during my three year B.Ed, or any CPD since. I’ve observed this network of teachers, governors, inspectors and academics grow in number and in influence, with policy makers and the inspectorate engaging with classroom teachers and senior leaders in ways which were unimaginable less than a decade ago. The network now straddles the space between virtuality and reality, with teachmeets and events such as ResearchEd providing platforms to meet and share ideas, evidence and hashtags in real time.

I attended my first ResearchEd only last year, meeting in flesh those names that have become figures of my adoration. And that they recognised me by my Twitter handle was the strangest feeling. It was a phenomenal event, attended by hundreds of people in their own time at a weekend. Attendees and speakers had travelled from across the globe to share in healthy debate, not tainted by hostile divisions but rather united in a spirit of belief in the power of education.

But the virtual network isn’t all smiles and winks. It is a mirror-world, and it has its dark corners in which lurk the nasties and the strange. In recent weeks, I was labelled an alt-right, pseudo-trad, fascist for daring to query ideas about differentiation. Elsewhere, schools claim great things and their detractors label them nazi. The language of edutwitter is both enriching, and morbidly fascinating. It rewards and punishes. It offers the promise of gold, and delivers tin. And I love it.